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Breeder Alan Krivanek checks on tomato plants. Photo: Max Whittaker/Washington Post

Breeder Alan Krivanek checks on tomato plants. Photo: Max Whittaker/Washington Post

Tweaking 10,000 years of plant history Adrian Higgins Washington Post April 16, 2014

The relationship between single mothers and poverty is not as simple as it seems Emily Badger Washington Post April 10, 2014 See full report

Student Paul Vaughn, 22, poses for a portrait on the campus of George Mason University on Thursday in Fairfax. Vaughn has struggled with living expenses, including food costs. Photo: Matt McClain/The Washington Post

Student Paul Vaughn, 22, poses for a portrait on the campus of George Mason University on Thursday in Fairfax. Vaughn has struggled with living expenses, including food costs. Photo: Matt McClain/The Washington Post

More college students battle hunger as education and living costs rise Tara Bahrampour Washington Post April 9, 2014

What we know about how poor neighborhoods become wealthier: very few of them do and many of those that do are in cities with substantial income growth Emily Badger Washington Post April 9, 2014  See Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland report

Ohio farm with statue of chicken.  Photo: Washington Post

What economic recovery looks like: In rural Ohio, Perham Egg wants to hire 40 people at its new factory. But in some places, matching the jobs to the job-seekers can prove a struggle. Photo: Washington Post

The recovery puzzle: A new factory in Ohio struggles to match jobs to job-seekers Monica Hesse Washington Post April 5, 2014 Hiring rises, but number of jobless stays high Nelson D. Schwartz New York Times April 4, 2014

Here’s why the gender wage gap hasn’t budged in a decade Ylan Mui Washington Post March 17, 2014 Also see The truth about the pay gap New York Times April 9, 2014

Income gap, meet the longevity gap Annie Lowrey New York Times March 15, 2013

Worker on the Nissan truck assembly line.  Photo: Nissan/Washington Post

Worker on the Nissan truck assembly line.  Photo: Nissan/Washington Post

This is what a job in the US’s new manufacturing industry looks like—half the pay, working for a temp agency, no sick days, but still it's a job Lydia DePillis Washington Post March 9, 2014

Two indian youths by irrigation canal. Photo: Washington Post

Youths’ suicides rattle Indian country: The silence that has shrouded suicide in Indian country is being pierced by growing alarm at the sheer numbers of young Native Americans taking their own lives — more than three times the national average, and up to 10 times the average on some reservations. Photo: Washington Post

The hard lives—and high suicide rate—of Native American children on reservations Sari Horowitz Washington Post March 10, 2013

Obesity rate for young children plummets 43 percent in a decade Sabrina Tavernise New York Times February 25, 2014

Picture of tractor in farm field. Photo: Bigstock

Industry analysts say the institutional share of US farmland ownership is rising quickly. Photo: Bigstock

Half of US farmland being eyed by private equity Carey L Biron Inter Press Service February 19, 2014

Spending on violence in the United States Daniel Hyslop Economists for Peace and Security February 19, 2014

Minimum-wage hike would reduce poverty, but might cost 500,000 jobs, Congressional Budget Ofice reports Zachary A Goldfarb Washington Post February 18, 2014

Jackie Heintzelman serviing coffee to a patron at the Little Palomino, a restaurant and bar in Ontario, Ore. Photo: Kyle Green/New York Times

"Everything is paid for, and that is a luxury in itself." Jackie Heintzelman, who said keeping up with bills was easier since she started driving from Idaho to work at the Little Palomino, a restaurant and bar in Ontario, Ore. Photo: Kyle Green/New York Times

Crossing borders and changing lives, lured by higher state minimum wages Kirk Johnson New York Times February 15, 2014

State park rangers burned weeds on the exposed lake bed of the Rye Patch Reservoir in Nevada, which was at 3.5 percent capacity amid a drought that has caused the worst water shortage the region has faced in more than a century.

Obama to propose $1 billion to prepare for climate change in US Zachary A Goldfarb and Lenny Bernstein Washington Post February 14, 2014 Severe drought has western US fearing worst Adam Nagourney and Ian Lovett New York Times February 1, 2014  See HN special report on environment and hunger

Obesity found to gain its hold in earliest years Gina Kolata New York Times January 29, 2014 See more nutrition and health stories

Farm bill on verge of passage after a long three years of haggling in Congress Ed O’Keefe and Kimberly Kindy Washington Post February 4, 2014 Farm bill compromise will change programs and reduce spending. Bill must now be voted on by both House and Senate. Ron Dixon New York Times January 27, 2014  The 2014 farm bill nutrition title includes bipartisan improvements to SNAP while excluding harsh House provisions Ed Bolen, Dorothy Rosenbaum, and Stacy Dean Center on Budget and Policy Priorities January 28, 2014

The new face of food stamps: working-age Americans. As US wages stagnate, food stamp use growing fastest among workers with some college training.  Hope Yen Associated Press January 27, 2014

Obama to raise minimum wage for government contract workers Zachary A Goldfarb Washington Post January 27, 2014

Proposal to raise tip wages resisted Steven Greenhouse New York Times January 26, 2013

Low wage workers have far more education than they did in in 1968, but they make far less Lawrence Mishel Economic Policy Institute January 23, 2014

In memory of Martin Luther King
Heaven will wecome you, Dr. King
Big Maybelle
Why (The King of Love is Dead)
Nina Simone

(song in tribute, written immediately after MLK's assassination on April 4, 1968)

Economic mobility hasn’t changed in a half-century in America, economists declare Jim Tankersly Washington Post January 22, 2014

Christopher and Melinda, shown here with their two children,  were participants in a program designed to strengthen families. Photo courtesy CFUF

Christopher and Melinda were participants in a program, which the state of Maryland will be expanding this month, designed to strengthen families. Photo courtesy CFUF

Dead broke, not deadbeat: Baltimore rethinks welfare policy Alia Malek Al Jazeera America January 15, 2014

One in three Americans slipped below the poverty line between 2009 and 2011 Brad Plumer Washington Post January 8, 2014 See full Census Bureau report (32 page pdf file)

‘Great Society’ agenda led to great—and lasting—philosophical divide Karen Tumulty Washington Post January 8, 2013 50 years later, war on poverty is a mixed bag (analysis) Annie Lowery New York Times January 4, 2014 Graphic: 50 years of poverty Alicia Parlapiano New York Times January 4, 2014

Seattle SeaTac’s minimum wage workers might not get their raise after all Lydia DePillis Washington Post December 29, 2014

Demonstrators rally for better wages outside a McDonald's restaurant in New York City as part of a national protest on Dec. 5. Photo: Richard Drew/AP

Demonstrators rally for better wages outside a McDonald's restaurant in New York City as part of a national protest on Dec. 5. Photo: Richard Drew/AP

Majority of Americans want minimum wage to be increased, poll finds Michael A. Fletcher and Peyton M. Craighill Washington Post December 18, 2013

Man and woman walking along the road in Woonsocket, RI with bags of food purchased with food stamps. Photo: Washington Post

New research has found that with the help of food stamps and unemployment insurance, the percentage of Americans who are poor has decreased since the 1960s. Above is a scene from Woonsocket, R.I., where a third of the residents receive nutritional assistance. Photo: Washington Post

Study: US poverty rate decreased over past half-century thanks to safety-net programs Zachary A Goldfarb Washington Post December 9, 2013 See full report (25 page pdf file) Here’s how the safety net has—and hasn’t—reduced poverty in the US Brad Plumer Washington Post December 10, 2013

Dasani family lives in the Auburn Family Residence in the Fort Green neighorhood of New York City, a decrepit city-run shelter for the homeless. It is a place where mold creeps up walls and roaches swarm, where feces and vomit plug communal toilets, where sexual predators have roamed and small children stand guard for their single mothers outside filthy showers.

Invisible child: Dasani's homeless life Andrea Elliot New York Times December 9, 2013  See US hunger images and stories

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