U.S. Global Nutrition Investments: The Lynchpin for Achieving Broader Health and Development Goals

Efforts to improve nutrition are among the most transformative and cost-effective interventions in global health and food security. Affecting one in three people globally, malnutrition is inherently intertwined with other pressing health and development challenges. As the single largest donor to global nutrition efforts, the United States plays a critical role in addressing malnutrition and advocating greater global support. Uganda, as a focal country of U.S. nutrition, health, food security, and agriculture initiatives, provides a specific lens through which to assess U.S. support and global opportunities for advancing nutrition. The CSIS Global Health Policy Center and the CSIS Global Food Security Project are co-hosting this event to launch their report from a recent research trip to the country and discuss the future of nutrition as a priority within U.S. development assistance policy.

Opening Remarks

Kimberly Flowers
Director, Global Food Security Project & Humanitarian Agenda

Panel Discussion

Alma Crumm Golden
Deputy Assistant Administrator, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)
Robert Mwadime
Chief of Party, USAID Integrated Community and Nutrition Activity (ICAN)
Meera Shekar
Global Lead, Health, Nutrition & Population, World Bank

Moderator

Sara M. Allinder
Deputy Director & Senior Fellow, Global Health Policy Center, CSIS
This event is made possible through the generous support of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
For more information, or to register, please visit: https://www.csis.org/node/47407
Event will be webcast

Rising obesity in Africa reflects a broken global food system

When I visited Kigali, Rwanda’s capital last week, I noticed an array of new fast food restaurants downtown. This is not an exception — chains such as Burger King, Pizza Hut and KFC are proliferating across Africa. Meanwhile, obesity rates are skyrocketing across the continent.

Race to the Next Income Frontier: How Senegal and Other Low-Income Countries Can Reach the Finish Line

Opening Remarks

Christine Lagarde, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund

Moderator

Masood Ahmed, President, Center for Global Development; former President

Panelists

Daouda Sembene, Executive Director,International Monetary Fund

Vijaya Ramachandran, Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development

Gyude Moore, Visiting Fellow, Center for Global

  • Christine Lagarde, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund

Moderator: 

  • Masood Ahmed, President, Center for Global Development; former President

Panelists: 

  • Daouda Sembene, Executive Director,International Monetary Fund
  • Vijaya Ramachandran, Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development
  • Gyude Moore, Visiting Fellow, Center for Global Development

Please join us for the launch of a new book published by the International Monetary Fund, Race to the Next Income Frontier: How Senegal and Other Low-Income Countries Can Reach the Finish Line. Following remarks from IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde, the panel will discuss the political economy of reform.

Race to the Next Income Frontier explores economic transformation and diversification, using Senegal as an example. In many low-income countries rent seeking and patronage have generated stability at the expense of inclusive growth and have held back development. Policymakers know what is needed to address these problems and put good policies in place, but how to do it remains a challenge. This book examines how to navigate the political economy of reform to achieve economic transformation.

Click here for more information and to register.