Agriculture & Nutrition

India plans big increase in health-care spending to catch up to rivals

by Rama Lakshmi Washington Post March 9, 2012

In recent years, India has watched with alarm as countries such as China, Egypt, Mexico and Brazil raced ahead, and as its performance on child health and infant mortality was overtaken even by much of sub-Saharan Africa. ...

Fund halts new grants for AIDS, TB and malaria treatment in poor countries as developed country contributions drop

by David Brown Washington Post November 23, 2011

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, which underwrites AIDS treatment for about half the people getting it in developing countries, announced Wednesday that it will make no new grants for the next two years because of the worldwide economic downturn....

Report cites dramatic drop in AIDS deaths worldwide

by David Brown Washington Post November 21, 2011

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Malaria accounts for 20% of childhood deaths in Africa. Photo: Getty Images

Malaria deaths fall over 20% worldwide in last decade

by BBC News October 18, 2011

There has been a fall of just over 20% in the number of deaths from malaria worldwide in the past decade, the World Health Organization says....

Fall in funding raises question mark over future of global fight against Aids: International financing for HIV programs in developing nations worldwid...

by Claire Provost Poverty Matters Blog August 19, 2011

International funding for Aids programmes in developing countries across the world dropped by 10% in 2010, according to a new report, raising concern that funding for the global fight against HIV and Aids may be on a long-term downward trend....

A special child (opinion)

by Dan Shaughnessy World Hunger Education Service August 3, 2011

August 3, 2011 Demographers tell us that sometime in September or October, probably in Central India, a very special child will be born. The exact time and place will never be precisely known, and this Special Child’s first tiny cry will not heard beyond a hut or a village, but the event will b...

The delivery room of a hospital in Arua, Uganda. The 400-bed hospital has a shortage of doctors and midwives and lacks many basic medical supplies. Photo: Tadej Znidarcic/New York Times   More Photos

Maternal deaths focus harsh light on Uganda

by Celia W. Dugger New York Times July 29, 2011

ARUA, Uganda — Jennifer Anguko was slowly bleeding to death right in the maternity ward of a major public hospital. Only a lone midwife was on duty, the hospital later admitted, and no doctor examined her for 12 hours. An obstetrician who investigated the case said Ms. Anguko, the mother of three ...

Clinics like this one in Tumbu have been jammed since Sierra Leone ended some fees in 2010 Photo: Sven Torfinn/New York Times

Sierra Leone government eliminates medical fees for children and pregnant women, resulting in huge increase in patients

by Adam Nossiter New York Times July 17, 2011

WATERLOO, Sierra Leone — The paramedic’s eyes were bloodshot, his features drawn. Pregnant women jammed into the darkened concrete bunker, just as they had yesterday and would tomorrow. The increase in patients had been fivefold, or tenfold. The exhausted paramedic had lost count in a blur of un...

Breastfeeding babies is vital, say experts.”Some of the [Nestle] marketing strategy presents formula as better than breastfeeding,” Laurence Gray, World Vision’s Asia-Pacific advocacy director, told IRIN. However, in developing countries, formula is frequently prepared in unhygienic circumstances with unsafe water and misunderstood instructions, with bad results for babies. “In poor nations, formula-fed infants are four to six times more likely to die of infectious disease than breastfed babies,” said Gray. “The problem is not with the formula, but with the preparation,” he added.   Photo: UNICEF

Laos: NGOs flay Nestlé’s infant formula marketing, some of which presents infant formula as better than breastfeeding

by IRIN News June 23, 2011

"Some of the marketing strategy presents formula as better than breastfeeding,” Laurence Gray, World Vision’s Asia-Pacific advocacy director, told IRIN. “It doesn’t take into account the circumstances needed to prepare the formula.” ...

Lambo, 3, with his grandmother and mother, Samina Tahiaritsoa, at the Centre for Treatment of Acute Malnutrition with Complications (CRENI) in the town of Amboasary Sud. According to the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), two out of three Malagasy live in poverty and 50 percent of children younger than five have stunted growth due to malnutrition.  “Above all, it’s the poverty that’s causing this,” said CRENI’s head doctor, Samuel Rasaivaonirina, adding that most wage earners support an average household of 10 people on just $10 a month.  Photo: Hannah McNeish/IRIN

Madagascar: Poverty and malnutrition on sisal plantations

by IRIN News June 23, 2011

At the Centre for Treatment of Acute Malnutrition with Complications (CRENI) in the town of Amboasary Sud in the Anosy region of southeastern Madagascar, Samina Tahiaritsoa, 20, cradles her son, Lambo, 3, who still weighs less than six kilograms after 10 days at the centre....

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  • For the past 40 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes, that
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    • Promote individual and collective commitments to sustainable hunger solutions.