Asia

India court orders Dehli government to provide shelters for destitute pregnant women so that they can receive care while giving birth

by Nilanjana Bhowmick guardian.co.uk February 3, 2011

n January, Shanti Devi, a woman living below the poverty line, died after giving birth to a premature baby. She had not eaten for three days before her delivery. A few months later, Fatima, 24, a destitute woman who suffered from epilepsy, was forced to give birth under a tree on a crowded street in...

In China, human costs are built Into an iPad

by Charles Duhigg and David Barboza New York Times January 25, 2011

The explosion ripped through Building A5 on a Friday evening last May, an eruption of fire and noise that twisted metal pipes as if they were discarded straws....

Did 22-year-old Saima Bibi scream out as she was electrocuted at her parents’ home in their village near the southern Punjab city of Bahawalpur in Pakistan? Did she plead with her family for her life? Did she seek mercy? The answers to these questions will never be known. In one of the most harrowing “honour” killings reported in recent months in the country, Saima was, according to media reports, murdered by her relatives. They committed the crime following a ruling by a gathering of village elders that she be put to death by electrocution for eloping with a man she had chosen to marry. Police are investigating the murder and the prime minister has ordered the findings be submitted urgently. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Pakistan: Hundreds of women die for “honor” each year

by IRIN News January 22, 2011

Did 22-year-old Saima Bibi scream out as she was electrocuted at her parents’ home in their village near the southern Punjab city of Bahawalpur in Pakistan? Did she plead with her family for her life? Did she seek mercy? ...

Ravindra Misal–leading the revolution in Umred, a small Indian town. The NYT reporter came to the  town  to write about a riot, and he discoverd Misal. A few months earlier, power blackouts that rural Indians always suffered silently triggered a violent reaction in Umred. Why? Umred was just another small town in the middle of nowhere, dusty and underwhelming. But Umred had begun to dream, townspeople told me, because of television, because of cousins with tales of call-center jobs and freedom in the city. Once Umred contracted ambition, blackouts became intolerable.  Photo: Bharat Sikka/New York Times

Ravindra Misal: Trying to help some of India’s poor and caste-restricted young (and himself) achieve upward mobility by beginning to learn the w...

by Anand Giridharadas New York Times December 30, 2010

I came to Umred to write about a riot. A few months earlier, power blackouts that rural Indians always suffered silently triggered a violent reaction. Why? Umred was just another small town in the middle of nowhere, dusty and underwhelming. But Umred had begun to dream, townspeople told me, because ...

In 2002, Rubina Sandhi’s home burned down by Hindu mobs during anti-Muslim riots. Instead of turning to violence, she is one of India’s many Muslims who are fighting back against extremism. Photo: Siddharaj/Washington Post

In India, a struggle for moderation as a young Moslem woman quietly battles extremism

by Emily Wax Washington Post December 28, 2010

It was Sept. 11, 2001. Television sets in the mosques, tea shops and market were beaming images of the World Trade Center engulfed in flames in New York. Five months later, Rubina's house was burning as Hindu mobs torched Muslim areas of her city, leaving thousands of people homeless. She remembers ...

A supermarket provides transportation to female employees to protect them from harassment. Photo: Kuni Takahashi/ New York Times

Necessity pushes Pakistani women into jobs and peril

by Adam B. Ellick New York Times December 26, 2010

KARACHI, Pakistan — Dinner at Rabia Sultana’s house is now served over a cold silence. Her family has not spoken to her since May, when Ms. Sultana, 21, swapped her home life for a cashier’s job at McDonald’s....

India’s battle against hunger beset by problems of delivery and corruption. Malnutrition is on the rise, despite nutrition rehabilitation center...

by Julien Bouissou Guardian December 10, 2010

There are times when chilli mixed with a little water is not enough to quell the hunger. Then the people of Gautam Nagar, one of 300 slum settlements in the city of Bhopal, India, gather round the only available screen to watch music videos. More than 60 families live in cramped quarters on wastelan...

Telecom scandal erupts in India: corruption and ‘crony capitalism’ appear to have cost the Indian government as much as US$40 billion in l...

by Jim Yardley and Heather Timmons New York Times December 10, 2010

NEW DELHI — Tycoons with friends in high places. Public tenders conducted by irregular rules. Tens of billions of dollars in potential losses for the national treasury. Allegations of government ministers on the take, and of a respected prime minister too aloof to notice....

Villagers work at a road construction site under a government program in Andhra Pradesh, India. In decades past, fraud and waste have sapped efforts to help the poor. Rajiv Gandhi, a former prime minister, famously estimated that only 15 percent of every rupee spent on the poor actually reached them. Photo: Kuni Takahashi/New York Times

The Indian state of Andhra Pradesh empowers the poor to fight corruption

by Lydia Polgreen New York Times December 2, 2010

NAGARKURNOOL, India — The village bureaucrat shifted from foot to foot, hands clasped behind his back, beads of sweat forming on his balding head. The eyes of hundreds of wiry village laborers, clad in dusty lungis, were fixed upon him....

Hands reach to touch the hand of Aung San Suu Kyi after her release from house arrest in Yangon. Photo: AP

Democracy leader Suu Kyi urges ‘real genuine talks’ in Burma

by Steve Finch and John Pomfret Washington Post November 15, 2010

Pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi said Monday that she would seek dialogue with the military leaders who imprisoned her for 15 of the past 20 years, suggesting in one of her first interviews since her release that her strategy for bringing change to Burma will be one of compromise. ...

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  • For the past 40 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes, that
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    • Promote individual and collective commitments to sustainable hunger solutions.