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AFRICA

Africa Hunger and Poverty Facts   Africa Web Links 
World Child Hunger Facts

The meal of dried bean leaves with a tomato prepared by 83-year-old Rosa Mastindi in Mbavari – the only crop she has been able to grow.  Photograph: Lucy Lamble/The Guardian

The meal of dried bean leaves with a tomato prepared by 83-year-old Rosa Mastindi in Mbavari – the only crop she has been able to grow. Her grandson Success, 18, has had to drop out of school. They cannot afford cooking oil. Photograph: Lucy Lamble/The Guardian

'It's a disaster': children bear brunt of southern Africa's devastating drought In southern Malawi and Zimbabwe, drought is overwhelming communities, forcing families to rely on meals of leaves and watermelon soup. Lucy Lamble The Guardian April 21, 2016

Boko Haram is losing, but so is food production Mbom Sixtus IRIN News March 11, 2016

 man takes his banana crop to market near the Kampala–Mbarara road, Uganda. Photo: Tim Woods

A man takes his banana crop to market near the Kampala–Mbarara road, Uganda. Photo: Tim Woods

Bananas, corn and beans facing a bleak future as staple African crops decline Sam Jones The Guardian March 7, 2016

To address the shortage of drinking water, the government rents distribution trucks to provide water to various remote areas in the Oromia region. Three times a week, the truck dispenses water by digging a hole in the ground, placing a plastic covering and creating a small pond for residents to fill their containers. Photo: Aida Muluneh/The Washington Post

To address the shortage of drinking water, the government rents distribution trucks to provide water to various remote areas in the Oromia region. Three times a week, the truck dispenses water by digging a hole in the ground, placing a plastic covering and creating a small pond for residents to fill their containers. Photo: Aida Muluneh/The Washington Post

History repeats itself in Ethiopia Ethiopia is in the midst of a devastating drought while donors have been distracted by crises in Syria and other parts of the world. Paul Schemm Washington Post February 22, 2016

Community members walk toward the Zambezi River in Tete Province, Mozambique, where land grabbing for coal mining has displaced people and impacted their food sovereignty. Photo: Justiça Ambiental

Community members walk toward the Zambezi River in Tete Province, Mozambique, where land grabbing for coal mining has displaced people and impacted their food sovereignty. Photo: Justiça Ambiental

Mozambique's movement to end land grabs Anabela Lemos Justiça Ambiental (Mozambique) March 1, 2016

To address the shortage of drinking water, the government rents distribution trucks to provide water to various remote areas in the Oromia region. Three times a week, the truck dispenses water by digging a hole in the ground, placing a plastic covering and creating a small pond for residents to fill their containers. Photo: Aida Muluneh/The Washington Post

To address the shortage of drinking water, the government rents distribution trucks to provide water to various remote areas in the Oromia region. Three times a week, the truck dispenses water by digging a hole in the ground, placing a plastic covering and creating a small pond for residents to fill their containers. Photo: Aida Muluneh/The Washington Post

History repeats itself in Ethiopia Ethiopia is in the midst of a devastating drought while donors have been destracted by crises in Syria and other parts of the world. Paul Schemm Washington Post February 22, 2016

How to see a famine before it starts The U.S. government can predict food insecurity before it occurs. But the warnings aren’t always heeded. Robinson Meyer The Atlantic February 3, 2016

A farmer and his sons learn how to use a digital camera. Photo: Erin Scronce/CGAP

A farmer and his sons learn how to use a digital camera. Photo: Erin Scronce/CGAP

Photo essay: Through the lens of a smallholder The lives of farmers in Mozambique showing their challenges and successes.  CGAP February, 2016 Also see World hunger photos: the stories and images of people's lives

Measuring the cost of hunger in Africa's emerging economies The Guardian February 17, 2016 See the 10 crucial findings. See the (40 page abridged) report The Cost of Hunger in Africa.

Elizabeth Mpofu of Zimbabwe is General Coordinator of the international peasant movement La Via Campesina, a coalition of 164 organizations in 73 countries around the world, representing about 200 million peasant, landless, indigenous, and other farmers. She is also Chairperson of Zimbabwe Organic Smallholder Farmers Forum, and herself a farmer.

La Via Campesina, buiding a international movement for food and seed sovereignty: An interview with general coordinator Elizabeth Mpofu Simone Adler Other Worlds February 16, 2016

n this photo taken Sunday Jan. 29, 2016, impoverished cattle walk along a dried up river bed in Zimbabwe. Photo: © Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi

In this photo taken Sunday Jan. 29, 2016, impoverished cattle walk along a dried up river bed inwalk along a dried up river bed in the village of Chivi, Zimbabwe. Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe has declared a state of disaster as the country struggles to deal with a drought afflicting the region. (AP ) Photo: © Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi

Drought-stricken Zimbabwe declares state of disaster Farai Mutsaka Associated Press February 5, 2016

Ekai Lopeyak walks home carrying the body of one of his family’s goats, which he found dead outside the town of Kalokol on the western shore of Lake Turkana in November. Photo: © Emily H. Johnson/For The Washington Post

Ekai Lopeyak walks home carrying the body of one of his family’s goats, which he found dead outside the town of Kalokol on the western shore of Lake Turkana in November. Traditional pastoralists have turned to fishing in ever greater numbers in recent years as drought has decimated their herds of livestock. Photo: © Emily H. Johnson/The Washington Post

Climate change could devastate Africa. It’s already hurting this Kenyan town. Abigail Higgins Washington Post January 30, 2016

Women mourn at the funeral for Dinka Chala, a schoolteacher who family members said was shot to death by military forces during a protest in Holonkomi, in the Oromo region of Ethiopia. Photo: ©  Tiksa Negeri/Reuters

Women mourn at the funeral for Dinka Chala, a schoolteacher who family members said was shot to death by military forces during a protest in Holonkomi, in the Oromo region of Ethiopia. Photo: ©  Tiksa Negeri/Reuters

Ethiopia confronts its worst ethnic violence in years as government tries to take away community lands Paul Schemm Washington Post January 14, 2015

Government soldiers not yet ready to tackle the Simbas. Photo: © Guy Oliver/IRIN

Government soldiers not yet ready to tackle the Simbas. Photo: © Guy Oliver/IRIN

Congo’s forgotten war: The militia of Mambasa Claude Muhindo Sengenya IRIN News January 8, 2015

Mphathe, kneeling bottom row on right, with women of Dzomo la Mupo. Photo courtesy of Mphathe Makaulele

Mphathe, kneeling bottom row on right, with women of Dzomo la Mupo. Photo courtesy of Mphathe Makaulele

African women organize to reclaim agriculture against corporate takeover (from an interview with Mphatheleini Makaulele) Simon Adler and Beverly Bell Other Worlds January 6, 2016

Inside Eritrea: Conscription and poverty drive exodus from secretive African state David Smith The Guardian December 23, 2015

Farmers, civil society organizations rally behind environmentalist jailed for exposing land grabbing in Cameroon Mborn Sixtus Inter Press Service December 15, 2015 Also see HN special report Trade and Hunger.

Woman farmer in Zimbabwe. Photo: © Busani Bafana/IPS

Farmers will have limited access to climate smart agricultural knowledge and skills as cash strapped Zimbabwe cuts technical assistance from agricultural extension officers. Photo: © Busani Bafana/IPS

Weak agricultural finance, drought feed malnutrition in Zimbabwe Ignatius Banda Inter Press Service December 15, 2015

Two young members of a South Sudan militia. Photo: Jason Patinkin/IRIN

Around 80 percent of South Sudan’s working-age youth are unemployed or underemployed, and many have joined the conflict. Loyola-Marymount University’s professor of African Studies, Jok Madut Jok.explains: “Why do all these unemployed youths flock to the conflict? They join because they have nothing to lose because corruption has not allowed resources to trickle down” to create jobs for them and give them a future, he told IRIN. Photo: Jason Patinkin/IRIN

Fueled by corruption, South Sudan war enters its third year Karin Zeitvogel IRIN News December 17, 2015
South Sudan food team finds risk of 'widespread catastrophe'  Tom Miles Reuters November 26, 2015 See Harmful economic systems as a cause of hunger and poverty

2015 Africa    Hunger Notes Home Page