United States

Fast food workers call for nationwide walkout August 29 in support of $15 minimum wage

by Michael A Fletcher Washington Post August 19, 2013

Emboldened by an outpouring of support on social media, low-wage fast-food and retail workers from eight cities who have staged walkouts this year are calling for a national day of strikes Aug. 29....

California discourages needy from signing up for food stamps. The state’s participation rate is the lowest in the US—only about half of those ...

by Evan Halper Los Angeles Times August 17, 2013

WASHINGTON — It was not surprising that Texas held out. For years, Texas was among a handful of states that required every resident seeking help with grocery bills to first be fingerprinted, an exercise typically associated with criminals....

Head of secret court says court’s ability to police US spying program is limited

by Carol D Leonnig Washington Post August 15, 2013

The leader of the secret court that is supposed to provide critical oversight of the government’s vast spying programs said that its ability to do so is limited and that it must trust the government to report when it improperly spies on Americans....

NSA broke privacy rules thousands of times per year, audit finds

by Barton Gellman Washington Post August 15, 2013

The National Security Agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since Congress granted the agency broad new powers in 2008, according to an internal audit and other top-secret documents....

Trade with developing countries just got more expensive, thanks to Tom Coburn

by Lydia DePillis Washington Post August 12, 2013

The United States has a few ways to help out poor countries. It can just give them money, in the form of direct aid. It can give them stuff -- such as food, technology and weapons. Or it can simply stop taxing the goods they sell us, allowing their industries to grow and elevate the country on its o...

The Workers Defense Project, a union in spirit

by Steven Greenhouse New York Times August 10, 2013

LIKE most construction workers who come to see Patricia Zavala, the two dozen men who crowded into her office in Austin, Tex., one afternoon in March had a complaint....

Why is the U.S.’s 1 percent so much richer than everywhere else?

by Lydia DePillis Washington Post August 9, 2013

It's been nearly two years since Occupy Wall Street took over Zuccotti Park, and the academic establishment is still chewing through questions it raised about how to understand the 1 percent in America. In particular, how did they get so darn rich? And what would happen if we took some of their mone...

Two email services shut down to protect consumer data

by Somini Sengupta New York Times August 8, 2013

The shutdown of two small e-mail providers on Thursday illustrates why it is so hard for Internet companies to challenge secret government surveillance: to protect their customers’ data from federal authorities, the two companies essentially committed suicide....

In Baltimore, a class of 5-year-olds at Union Baptist Harvey Johnson Head Start jump during a motion break. Union Baptist makes a point of promoting health. Photo: Jessica Kourkounis/New York Times

Poor children show a decline in obesity rate

by Sabrina Tavernise New York Times August 6, 2013

After years of growing concern about obesity among children, federal researchers have found the clearest evidence yet that the epidemic may be turning a corner in young children from low-income families....

Post-recession, a greater share of food-insecure children have parents who are unemployed or working part-time

by Alisha Coleman-Jensen and Mark Nord Amber Waves August 5, 2013

Between 2007 and 2011, the percentage of U.S. households with food-insecure children increased from 8.3 to 10.0 percent. Households with food insecurity among children are those in which one or more children lack consistent access to adequate food because the household has insufficient money and oth...