The way North: a day by day journey by two reporters up Interstate 35 from Laredo, Tex., to Duluth, Minn., chronicling how the middle of America is being changed by immigration

by Damien Cave and Todd Heisler

Immigrants from more than 30 countries recently became American citizens at the local headquarters for the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service in Irving, Texas. Happy Muigai, center, originally from Kenya, during the citizenship ceremony. Photo: Todd Heisler/New York Times

At migrant shelters in Tijuana, and in boardinghouses just south of Arizona and Texas, I have met dozens of Mexican and Central American immigrants over the past three years who told me, often in English, that they were trying to get back to the lives and the families they had built in Los Angeles and Seattle; Durham, N.C.; or Des Moines.

  • World Hunger Education
    Service
    P.O. Box 29015
    Washington, D.C. 20017
  • For the past 40 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes, that
    • Educate the general public and target groups about the extent and causes of hunger and malnutrition in the United States and the world
    • Advance comprehension which integrates ethical, religious, social, economic, political, and scientific perspectives on the world food problem
    • Facilitate communication and networking among those who are working for solutions
    • Promote individual and collective commitments to sustainable hunger solutions.