How a California organization uses discarded food to help solve hunger

by Jonathan Winslow

Ryan Learakos, right, with Waste Not OC Coalition, delivers food to Mary’s Kitchen a nonprofit in Orange on Monday, Nov. 20, 2017. [Photo: Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG]

This year, nearly 11.5 million pounds of excess food in Orange County, California, normally headed toward the garbage bin, went instead to help those struggling with food insecurity, thanks to a model developed by the Waste Not OC Coalition and refined by its executive director, Mike Learakos.

  • World Hunger Education
    Service
    P.O. Box 29015
    Washington, D.C. 20017
  • For the past 40 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes, that
    • Educate the general public and target groups about the extent and causes of hunger and malnutrition in the United States and the world
    • Advance comprehension which integrates ethical, religious, social, economic, political, and scientific perspectives on the world food problem
    • Facilitate communication and networking among those who are working for solutions
    • Promote individual and collective commitments to sustainable hunger solutions.