In South Sudan, mothers are so hungry many can no longer breast-feed

by Kevin Sieff

South Sudanese women and children queue to receive emergency food July 25, 2016, at the U.N. protection of civilians (POC) Site 3, which hosts about 30,000 people displaced during the recent fighting in Juba, the capital of South Sudan. Photo: Adriane Ohanesian/Reuters
South Sudanese women and children queue to receive emergency food July 25, 2016, at the U.N. protection of civilians (POC) Site 3, which hosts about 30,000 people displaced during the recent fighting in Juba, the capital of South Sudan. Photo: Adriane Ohanesian/Reuters

Weeks after the outbreak of deadly fighting in South Sudan, aid groups say their movement is being restricted by continued violence and government checkpoints, harming their ability to get food and medicine to severely malnourished children.  “We already have an extremely serious food-insecurity crisis,” said U.N. Emergency Relief Coordinator Stephen O’Brien in an interview. “And there are many circumstances where, appallingly, this only gets worse.”…O’Brien said that during a trip to South Sudan this week, he met with mothers unable to breast-feed their babies because they themselves were not getting enough food.