Sarah Mohammed, who is eight months pregnant, plans to deliver inside her tent in Galkayo, Somalia, because there is no nearby hospital. Mohammed fled Mogadishu several months ago after watching an explosion tear apart her cousin. Photo:Sudarsan Raghavan/Washington Post

by Neil MacFarquhar

The half-dozen strangers who descended on the remote village of Soumouni, Mali brought its hand-to-mouth farmers alarming news: their humble fields, tilled from one generation to the next, were now controlled by Libya’s leader, Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, and the farmers would all have to leave. Across Africa and the developing world, a new global land rush is gobbling up large expanses of arable land and displacing farmers. The government in Mali has welcomed investors who will use the Niger River for irrigation. Photo:  Tyler Hicks/New York Times

SOUMOUNI, Mali — The half-dozen strangers who descended on this remote West African village brought its hand-to-mouth farmers alarming news: their humble fields, tilled from one generation to the next, were now controlled by Libya’s leader, Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, and the farmers would all have to leave.

  • World Hunger Education
    Service
    P.O. Box 29015
    Washington, D.C. 20017
  • For the past 40 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes, that
    • Educate the general public and target groups about the extent and causes of hunger and malnutrition in the United States and the world
    • Advance comprehension which integrates ethical, religious, social, economic, political, and scientific perspectives on the world food problem
    • Facilitate communication and networking among those who are working for solutions
    • Promote individual and collective commitments to sustainable hunger solutions.
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