Opportunity’s knocks: Tereza Sedgwick is seeing the economy from the bottom up, where the fastest-growing job in America, nursing aide, is also one of the hardest

by Eli Saslow

Tereza Sedgwick in the kitchen of her Bartlett, Ohio, home. Living in a borrowed house with no water, she uses tap water from jugs for brushing teeth and other chores.  Photo: Sarah L Vosin/Washington Post

MARIETTA, Ohio — She had made it as far as the career school’s parking lot for the December training class and the February class, only to drive away each time in a tangle of anxiety and self-doubt. Now it was March, and here Tereza Sedgwick came again: dressed in the mandatory class uniform of red-and-black scrubs, a lit cigarette dangling in her fingers out the busted window of her ’88 Plymouth. She parked in the lot and watched a procession of unemployed workers enter the school building in southeastern Ohio, trying to will herself to join them.

  • World Hunger Education
    Service
    P.O. Box 29015
    Washington, D.C. 20017
  • For the past 40 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes, that
    • Educate the general public and target groups about the extent and causes of hunger and malnutrition in the United States and the world
    • Advance comprehension which integrates ethical, religious, social, economic, political, and scientific perspectives on the world food problem
    • Facilitate communication and networking among those who are working for solutions
    • Promote individual and collective commitments to sustainable hunger solutions.
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