Opinions

The fight for civil rights, long after Martin Luther King

by John McWhorter, Jelani Cobb, Derecka Purnell, and Charles M. Payne New York Times January 19, 2015

The protests over the killings of unarmed black men by police have been called the start of a new civil rights movement. But a half-century after activists broke the back of Jim Crow, problems beyond police brutality persist for African-Americans: the wealth gap widens, higher education is less atta...

How expensive it is to be poor

by Charles Blow New York Times January 18, 2015

Earlier this month, the Pew Research Center released a study that found that most wealthy Americans believed “poor people today have it easy because they can get government benefits without doing anything in return.”...

Let’s address the State of Food

by Mark Bittman New York Times January 18, 2015

The state of the union, food-wise, is not good. The best evidence is that more than 46.5 million Americans are receiving SNAP benefits — formerly food stamps — a number that has not changed much since 2013, when it reached its highest level ever....

Republican candidates grapple with a touchy topic: poverty

by Eduardo Porter New York Times January 12, 2015

COLUMBIA, S.C. — On Saturday, only three weeks before voters in Iowa first get to weigh in on the presidential candidates, six Republican hopefuls gathered at a convention center here to talk about poverty. Donald Trump and Ted Cruz, the top two, weren’t there. But still, poverty?...

Ethiopia silences its critics with a deadly crackdown on dissent

by Washington Post January 8, 2015

Ethiopia has long been celebrated by the United States for its economic growth and its willingness to engage in the battle against the Somali extremist group al-Shabab. Generous U.S. aid has been granted. But the EPRDF regime, which won 100 percent of parlimentary seats in last year’s elections, i...

‘Returning citizens’ are still one of D.C.’s most marginalized and motivated groups

by Clinton Yates Washington Post January 6, 2015

“I was unfocused. I was very violent at one point, and they taught me how to conduct myself, as a human being, as a father, as a man and a citizen of Washington, D.C.” ...

What happened to the biggest land grab in Africa? Searching for ProSavana in Mozambique

by Timothy A Wise Foodtank December 20, 2014

What if you threw a lavish party for foreign investors, and no one came? By all accounts, that is what’s happening in Mozambique’s Nacala Corridor, the intended site for Africa’s largest agricultural development scheme – or land grab, depending on your perspective....

US-Mexico sugar deal means higher prices for consumers

by Washington Post December 9, 2014

GASOLINE PRICES in the United States are a perennial source of ambivalence, or at least they should be. When they’re up, motorists suffer but the environment benefits, because people conserve. Falling prices boost economic growth — but people drive more and carbon emissions rise....

World Food Program’s struggle to feed millions

by New York Times December 2, 2014

If the term “international community” is to have any meaning, it should denote the shared responsibility of all nations to assist people forced to flee their countries and lose their livelihood through no fault of their own....

On the national Day of Maize in Mexico, protecting the sacred plant

by Adelita San Vicente Tello Other Worlds are Possible November 11, 2014

Adelita San Vicente Tello speaking at local celebration of Mexico's first National Holiday of Native and Creole Seeds. Photo courtesy of Adelita San Vicente Tello....