Asia

Shahbaz Bhatti, Pakistan’s sole Christian minister, is assassinated in Islamabad –the second liberal minister killed this year who spoke o...

by Karin Brulliard and Shaiq Hussain Washington Post March 2, 2011

Shahbaz Bhatti, the sole Christian cabinet member in majority-Muslim Pakistan, was shot multiple times by gunmen who surrounded his car as he left for work from his mother's house, near his home in a residential neighborhood. The attackers fled, but fliers scattered at the scene bore the names of th...

Vietnam struggles to cope with rising prices

by IRIN News March 1, 2011

Vietnam's inflation rate is among Southeast Asia's highest and its population is struggling to keep up with sharp increases in food, fuel and electricity prices. ...

India announces changes to its subsidies; will hand out cash to its poor

by Rama Lakshmi Washington Post February 28, 2011

The Indian government provides subsidies on food grains and cooking gas for the poor through the Public Distribution System. The government in Panchkula District, Haryana is piloting a biometric system which recognizes fingerprints in place of the traditional ration cards in order to avoid duplicati...

North Korea sends SOS to world to feed its starving people

by Kim Sengupta The Independent February 11, 2011

In a dramatic and poignant sign of a state nearing collapse, North Korea has asked its embassies to appeal to foreign governments for aid to feed a population close to starvation....

Farmers plant onions in Jalgaon, India. The lack of basic farm equipment and infrastructure has held back production, even as the demand for food has risen greatly.  Photo: Kuni Takahashi/New York Times

Galloping growth, and hunger in India

by Vikas Bajaj New York Times February 11, 2011

BAMNOD, India — The 50-year-old farmer knew from experience that his onion crop was doomed when torrential rains pounded his fields throughout September, a month when the Indian monsoon normally peters out....

How India feeds 120 million kids a day

by Ben Arnoldy Christian Science Monitor February 9, 2011

BERI, INDIA — Shamvir Singh says he downs a glass of milk before walking to school, but when asked what else he eats at home, the 12-year-old droops his head in silence....

India court orders Dehli government to provide shelters for destitute pregnant women so that they can receive care while giving birth

by Nilanjana Bhowmick guardian.co.uk February 3, 2011

n January, Shanti Devi, a woman living below the poverty line, died after giving birth to a premature baby. She had not eaten for three days before her delivery. A few months later, Fatima, 24, a destitute woman who suffered from epilepsy, was forced to give birth under a tree on a crowded street in...

In China, human costs are built Into an iPad

by Charles Duhigg and David Barboza New York Times January 25, 2011

The explosion ripped through Building A5 on a Friday evening last May, an eruption of fire and noise that twisted metal pipes as if they were discarded straws....

Did 22-year-old Saima Bibi scream out as she was electrocuted at her parents’ home in their village near the southern Punjab city of Bahawalpur in Pakistan? Did she plead with her family for her life? Did she seek mercy? The answers to these questions will never be known. In one of the most harrowing “honour” killings reported in recent months in the country, Saima was, according to media reports, murdered by her relatives. They committed the crime following a ruling by a gathering of village elders that she be put to death by electrocution for eloping with a man she had chosen to marry. Police are investigating the murder and the prime minister has ordered the findings be submitted urgently. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Pakistan: Hundreds of women die for “honor” each year

by IRIN News January 22, 2011

Did 22-year-old Saima Bibi scream out as she was electrocuted at her parents’ home in their village near the southern Punjab city of Bahawalpur in Pakistan? Did she plead with her family for her life? Did she seek mercy? ...

Ravindra Misal–leading the revolution in Umred, a small Indian town. The NYT reporter came to the  town  to write about a riot, and he discoverd Misal. A few months earlier, power blackouts that rural Indians always suffered silently triggered a violent reaction in Umred. Why? Umred was just another small town in the middle of nowhere, dusty and underwhelming. But Umred had begun to dream, townspeople told me, because of television, because of cousins with tales of call-center jobs and freedom in the city. Once Umred contracted ambition, blackouts became intolerable.  Photo: Bharat Sikka/New York Times

Ravindra Misal: Trying to help some of India’s poor and caste-restricted young (and himself) achieve upward mobility by beginning to learn the w...

by Anand Giridharadas New York Times December 30, 2010

I came to Umred to write about a riot. A few months earlier, power blackouts that rural Indians always suffered silently triggered a violent reaction. Why? Umred was just another small town in the middle of nowhere, dusty and underwhelming. But Umred had begun to dream, townspeople told me, because ...

  • World Hunger Education
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  • For the past 40 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes, that
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    • Promote individual and collective commitments to sustainable hunger solutions.