Agriculture & Nutrition

UNAIDS reports progress against HIV: New infections have fallen and more people have access to treatment, although two-thirds of those infected still...

by Thomas H. Maugh II Los Angeles Times November 23, 2010

More than 1.2 million people began taking anti- HIV therapy in 2009, a 30% increase that brings the worldwide total to 5.2 million, UNAIDS said Monday in its annual report, but that still leaves 10 million people in the developing world in need of access to the lifesaving drugs....

Young boys bathing in a river in Nigeria known to be infected with the parasite that causes river blindness. Some 27 million people in Nigeria need treatment for river blindness, also known as onchocerciasis.  The disease is spread through the bite of a black fly that breeds in fast-flowing water. However, if at-risk people take the drug ivermectin, also known as Mectizan, annually for 15-17 years, the infection cycle is broken for life.  Photo: IRIN

River blindness in Nigeria: photo essay

by IRIN News October 8, 2010

Some 27 million people in Nigeria need treatment for river blindness, also known as onchocerciasis, according to NGO Sight Savers. The disease is spread through the bite of a black simulium fly, which breeds in fast-flowing water. However, if at-risk people take the drug ivermectin, also known as Me...

World hunger dips, but not by much

by IRIN News September 14, 2010

Higher incomes in Asian countries have lowered the number of hungry in 2010, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), but economists warn that volatile wheat prices are affecting other staple grains such as maize and rice, and could lead to setbacks....

One third of children in Sikasso are underweight for their age, and for acute malnutrition, the rate in Sikasso was 16 percent, according to the most recent government survey. Photo: Phuong Tran/ IRIN

In Mali’s richest region, Sikasso, malnutrition is as high as in the country’s barren north, due in large part to concentration on cash ...

by IRIN News December 29, 2009

Sikasso is one of Mali's most fertile regions, but under-five malnutrition is as high here as in the country’s barren north, according to government health data.Health workers and agricultural experts explain the paradox as a combination of a lack of nutritional awareness, and the concentration on...

Nigeria, once the worst-afflicted country in the world with an estimated 653,000 cases in 1989, appears to be free of guinea worm disease, which is a painful parasitic infection transmitted to humans through a  water supply contaminated with guinea worm larvae. Photo: Vanessa Vick/New York Times

Campaign to eradicate guinea worm in hard-hit Nigeria may have worked

by Donald G. McNeil Jr. New York Times December 5, 2009

After 20 years, the Carter Center is ready to declare a major victory in its war on guinea worm: Nigeria, once the worst-afflicted country in the world, appears to be free of the worms....

Population explosion to stop Africa’s attempt to attain MDGs

by AfriqueJet November 18, 2009

See Report...

Africa population tops one billion

by BBC News November 18, 2009

The number of people in Africa has passed the one billion mark, the UN Population Fund says in a report....

World hunger increases despite growth in food production

by IRIN News November 12, 2009

Even as world food production grows, hunger is on the rise in many poor countries, according to the Global Crop Prospects and Food Situation report for November, published by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on 12 November. ...

200 million children under the age of five in the developing world suffer from chronic undernutrition, causing one-third of deaths in children under f...

by BBC News November 11, 2009

Poor child nutrition still causes major problems in the developing world - despite some progress, experts say. A third of deaths in children under five in those countries are linked to poor diet, a report by Unicef suggests....

Slowed funding threatens AIDS fight, group says–recession, other factors causing international donors to pull back

by Karin Brulliard Washington Post November 5, 2009

JOHANNESBURG -- Slowed funding from international donors, including the United States, is imperiling recent dramatic gains in treating AIDS patients in the developing world, according to a new report....

  • World Hunger Education
    Service
    P.O. Box 29015
    Washington, D.C. 20017
  • For the past 40 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes, that
    • Educate the general public and target groups about the extent and causes of hunger and malnutrition in the United States and the world
    • Advance comprehension which integrates ethical, religious, social, economic, political, and scientific perspectives on the world food problem
    • Facilitate communication and networking among those who are working for solutions
    • Promote individual and collective commitments to sustainable hunger solutions.